Salvador Dali and Walt Disney collaboration – Destino

19 10 2011

IN 1937, Salvador Dalí wrote to his fellow Surrealist André Breton about his trip to California: ”I have come to Hollywood and am in contact with the three great American surrealists — the Marx Brothers, Cecil B. DeMille and Walt Disney.”

That might have been the end of it, if not for a party at the home of the producer Jack Warner, in 1945. There, Disney and Dalí ran into each other again, and, the next year, embarked on one of the 20th century’s least likely artistic collaborations: the creator of Mickey Mouse and the painter of melting clocks joined forces to create an animated short titled ”Destino” (”Destiny”).

Dalí told the press it would be ”a magical exposition of the problem of life in the labyrinth of time.” Nervously, Disney translated, calling it ”just a simple story of a girl in search of her real love.” For eight months, they worked on it, until Disney, citing postwar financial problems, abandoned the project.

In the 57 years since, the unfinished short has acquired the reputation of a lost masterpiece. ”Destino” is as legendary in animation circles as the phantom footage from ”The Magnificent Ambersons” is among movie buffs. But ”Destino” is lost no longer. Next month at the New York Film Festival, this six-and-a-half-minute legend will finally have its American premiere.

It has been reconstructed from Dalí’s paintings and drawings by a new generation of filmmakers who were guided by Disney’s nephew, Roy E. Disney, the vice chairman of the Walt Disney Company, and by Dalí’s assistant on the original project, John Hench, who is now 95. It’s a far cry from ”Snow White.” Dalí’s signature incongruities dominate the film; there are crawling ants, colossal statues, shadowy vistas, a baseball ballet and, of course, melting clocks. Still, Mr. Hench recalled in an interview, ”Walt approved the general terms, thinking rightly that whatever Dalí would produce would be an interesting set of images.”





Andy Bey

1 06 2011

 





Syl Johnson

28 04 2011

Born in Holly Springs, Syl JohnsonMississippi, soul legend Syl Johnson relocated to Chicago at an early age, falling under the spell of Windy City blues men such as his next door neighbor Magic Sam. His brother Mac Thompson was Sam’s bass player and before long Syl was picking guitar and blowing harmonica with Junior Wells, Billy Boy Arnold, Shakey Jake, Elmore James, Jimmy Reed and the Magic Man himself. Having contributed mightily to Junior Wells’ legendary Chief sessions, Johnson debuted with his first solo recordings on Federal Records with Freddie King backing him on guitar but his legacy was to come a few years down the road with the blues-fuelled soul rockers he’d cut for Twilight/ Twinight Records in the mid to late sixties. 1967 was the year Johnson made his presence known with the double whammy of “Come On And Sock It To Me” and “Dresses Too Short.” The latter was not only an explosively raw dance-floor filler, it was a meeting of the musical minds, as Johnson trekked down to Memphis’s Royal Recording to cut the song with Willie Mitchell in the production booth and the Hodges brothers (Hi Rhythm Section) backing him up. After seething social commentary such as 1969’s “Is It Because I’m Black” and 1970’s “Concrete Reservation,” Johnson signed to Hi and cut a trio of fine albums and several singles between 1971 and 1976. Remaining, albeit unfairly, somewhat in the shadow of Green, Johnson never gained the widespread popularity of his label mate, yet has kept his reputation as the king of blistering soul music intact with several albums on his own Shama imprint and a 1995 reunion with the Hodges brothers on Delmark. His reputation as a storming live performer is equaled only by his rightfully royal place in the deep soul pantheon.





Andy Bey

8 04 2011





Tabasxo Alley – Horn Blast

9 03 2011

Super Fly Funk Project made up of a cast of the supreme but illusive session players of the world that ended up in the right studio, on the right night, on the right vibe and with the right chemistry to create the perfect storm of funk delicacies. Lucky for us that session was recorded and you can hear one of those tracks it here…





Idris Muhammad

28 02 2011

Idris Muhammad -born November 13, 1939 in New Orleans, Louisiana‎) is one of the baddest drummers in my humble opinion. He was born Leo Morris before changing his name in the 1960s upon his conversion to Islam. He is known for his funky playing style and a definitive pocket all his own. He has released a number of albums as leader, and has played with a number of jazz legends including Lou Donaldson, Johnny Griffin, Pharoah Sanders and Grover Washington, Jr. He has been touring and recording with pianist Ahmad Jamal since 1995. At 15 years-old, one of Muhammad’s earliest recorded sessions as a drummer was on Fats Domino’s 1956 hit “Blueberry Hill”.





Parliament – give up the funk

21 11 2010

Funk upon a time…..